so-so semiprecious

Karen Peltier
MA in the History of Decorative Arts
I love comics and furniture
A couple weekends ago I attended the Comics and Medicine Conference in Baltimore, and was able to write a preview of the keynote speakers for the City Paper.  The above image is from keynote speaker Ellen Forney’s book Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me. 
Since admission to the conference was much pricier than your average alternative comic gathering and the strenuous onslaught of sitting through lectures all weekend is not as appealing to a wider audience, I want to share some of the topics which came up during the conference in hopes to encourage other voices to join the conversation of the ways comics share narratives of bodily and mental illness and what that means.
My problem is that I can’t concentrate all of my thoughts on that topic in one post or article. Shit gets personal real quick. But some of what I was able to see and hear at the conference has pushed me to want to share my ideas on topics I struggle with in hopes that it might allow me to better understand myself, as well as give understanding to others who could be dealing with similar issues (or simply dealing with me.)
So I want to follow through with this idea, sharing a few posts over the next couple weeks or so particularly about some of the books I felt should have been a part of the body of work discussed at the conference. As a whole, I really enjoyed the conference, and I’m grateful to everyone who made me able to attend. By choosing books that weren’t discussed, I just want to be able to approach these really complex issues through work I feel passionate about in the way it addresses certain themes, rather than make a stink about “i know more comics than you” type shit. 
Lastly, since I feel freaked out about starting this series of posts, I’m not going to reblog them (other than this) on my personal blog, but I invite anyone who is interested to follow so-sosemiprecious to read them, and reblog them with their own thoughts. 

A couple weekends ago I attended the Comics and Medicine Conference in Baltimore, and was able to write a preview of the keynote speakers for the City Paper.  The above image is from keynote speaker Ellen Forney’s book Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me. 

Since admission to the conference was much pricier than your average alternative comic gathering and the strenuous onslaught of sitting through lectures all weekend is not as appealing to a wider audience, I want to share some of the topics which came up during the conference in hopes to encourage other voices to join the conversation of the ways comics share narratives of bodily and mental illness and what that means.

My problem is that I can’t concentrate all of my thoughts on that topic in one post or article. Shit gets personal real quick. But some of what I was able to see and hear at the conference has pushed me to want to share my ideas on topics I struggle with in hopes that it might allow me to better understand myself, as well as give understanding to others who could be dealing with similar issues (or simply dealing with me.)

So I want to follow through with this idea, sharing a few posts over the next couple weeks or so particularly about some of the books I felt should have been a part of the body of work discussed at the conference. As a whole, I really enjoyed the conference, and I’m grateful to everyone who made me able to attend. By choosing books that weren’t discussed, I just want to be able to approach these really complex issues through work I feel passionate about in the way it addresses certain themes, rather than make a stink about “i know more comics than you” type shit. 

Lastly, since I feel freaked out about starting this series of posts, I’m not going to reblog them (other than this) on my personal blog, but I invite anyone who is interested to follow so-sosemiprecious to read them, and reblog them with their own thoughts. 

Damn, I forgot I never posted this on here!!
The way Edie works with space, time, architecture, decoration and queerness puts his work on a level beyond anything else I’ve ever seen. I’m still so gushy thinking about how important this work, Memory Palaces, is to me, and how grateful I am to him for talking with me about it. 
Check out the article at Animal!

Damn, I forgot I never posted this on here!!

The way Edie works with space, time, architecture, decoration and queerness puts his work on a level beyond anything else I’ve ever seen. I’m still so gushy thinking about how important this work, Memory Palaces, is to me, and how grateful I am to him for talking with me about it. 

Check out the article at Animal!

It’s an easily achievable pleasure to get lost in the world of Lale Westvind‘s comics. The expansive quality of her sprawling intergalactic terrain ranges from the outer limits of the cosmos to the inner-workings of the mind. “I believe that your thoughts completely affect your reality,” Westvind, suggests during a conversation after the final evening of MoCCA Fest in New York City from her home in Harlem. “Whether [that’s] because your thoughts affect your actions or because your thoughts are another type of matter or energy.” We discussed her new book Now and Here, along with a multitude of thematic and stylistic components that provide the richness, depth and excitement that feel like a signature of her outstanding body of work. Her characters and readers alikemay sense they are bushwhacking through infinity, and that’s kind of the point.
Check out the rest of the article on The Comics Journal

It’s an easily achievable pleasure to get lost in the world of Lale Westvind‘s comics. The expansive quality of her sprawling intergalactic terrain ranges from the outer limits of the cosmos to the inner-workings of the mind. “I believe that your thoughts completely affect your reality,” Westvind, suggests during a conversation after the final evening of MoCCA Fest in New York City from her home in Harlem. “Whether [that’s] because your thoughts affect your actions or because your thoughts are another type of matter or energy.” We discussed her new book Now and Here, along with a multitude of thematic and stylistic components that provide the richness, depth and excitement that feel like a signature of her outstanding body of work. Her characters and readers alikemay sense they are bushwhacking through infinity, and that’s kind of the point.

Check out the rest of the article on The Comics Journal

I wrote something for the City Paper blog about everything going on this weekend for PMF V. Special shout out to comix ppl I’m excited to see, Zach Harzard Vaupen, Lale Westvind and Mickey Z :3

I wrote something for the City Paper blog about everything going on this weekend for PMF V. Special shout out to comix ppl I’m excited to see, Zach Harzard Vaupen, Lale Westvind and Mickey Z :3

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY EVERYONE

HAPPY VALENTINES DAY EVERYONE

mustshare asked: I hate that your haul got taken/trashed. Offering my condolences. Ugh that fumes me every time I think of it

Appreciate it. CAB was still amazing and no harebrained housekeeper can change that. Having to deal with the looks of confusion from six staff members, including the head of security, at a nice ass hotel in Downtown Brooklyn as you tell them they threw away hundred of dollars of “comic books” is something I could’ve done without. The whole situation had so many layers of ball-dropping and miscommunication between departments I’m still not entirely sure of what happened to my books and why. The only excuse we got was that they were mistaken for “magazines.” This is also after the fact that the room was still reserved by me and had a do not disturb sign on the door. After having to tell the same story to the said six employees over the course of an hour, two books just happened to be found behind the desk: Heather Benjamin’s Exorcise Book and Tanino Liberatore’s Plasmando Riplasmando. Benjamin’s book has the very accurate warning of “Not for the Timid” on the cover accompanied by one of her whip-wielding, fluid-covered ladies. Liberatore’s book gives no such warning and is fronted by a topless, hairless, Grace Jones-looking woman wearing sunglasses, lace pants, and a suggestive strap across her chest. The back cover is a pin-up of Ranxerox and I guess some kind of red-haired version of Lubna? Whoever the girl character is, she is quite young, topless, and seemingly caught in a struggle with Ranx as her lifts her over his head. So yeah, the two books that were mysteriously not trashed were pretty much the most deviant, pornographic (and obviously awesome which is why we bought them) books we got from CAB. It took me a while to shake the idea after having those two books handed back to us that we were just waiting for the vice squad to bust down our door and take us away. Whatever the real story is, I’m pretty solid on the idea that whoever mistakenly cleaned the room to begin with was so morally outraged at what the found they took it upon themselves to trash it. Or maybe someone stole a whole lot of great comics, who knows.